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Nationalism and Social Theory

1st Edition

Modernity and the Recalcitrance of the Nation

Gerard Delanty; Patrick O'Mahony
eISBN-13: 9781412931830

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Additional Book Details

Why has nationalism proved so durable? What are the roots of its appeal? This sharp and accessible book slices through the myths surrounding nationalism and provides an important new perspective on this perennial subject.


The book argues that: nationalism is persistent, not merely because of its specific ideological appeal, but because it expresses some of the major conflicts in modernity; nationalism reflects and reinforces four key trends in western social development: state formation, democratization, capitalism and the rationalization of culture; the forms of nationalism can be organized into a comprehensive typology which is outlined in the course of this study; post-nationalism and cosmopolitanism are significant innovations in the debate about nation-states and nationalism; and that the new radical nationalisms have become powerful new movements in the global age.

Sold By SAGE Publications
ISBNs 9780761954514, 9780761954514, 0761954511, 9781446226216, 9780761954507, 9781412931830, 1412931835
Language English
Number of Pages 226
Edition 1st